Make the effort, branch out, discover more

So once again International Women’s Day has snuck up on me. I always mean to plan ahead for days like this so I have something profound, interesting or inspirational to put up here. Luckily for me, I just happen to be in the middle of reading something from an author who is all three of those things. One who just happens to be a woman, and someone I discovered by purposefully going outside my comfort zone.

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A while ago, I released most of the books on my shelves were from white, male writers and that keeping my reading so restricted was going to be limiting my own growth as a writer.

My first step to rectify this was a simple internet search for women writing in horror. From just a quick browse, the name Shirley Jackson kept popping up. And so I picked up her horror story The Haunting of Hill House.

And, as anyone else who has read this book will understand, I was instantly smitten.

I’d don’t know any writer who can so expertly craft stories that remain so intimately personal the more the action unfolds. Her protagonists – at least in what I’ve read so far – feel fleshed out and real beyond most writers. Usually, when we read we don’t think about how the characters are just that; characters. As good as they are, we know deep down they are not, and our willing suspension of disbelief allows us to ignore this as long as they fit the story world. But Jackson creates entire characters that you feel you know and understand intimately. The action of the plot may be happening all around them, but all of it is shown through such a focused point of view that it’s hard not to feel that we are not literally watching through the character’s eyes. Her grasp of the isolation felt only while in the midst of other people is pitch perfect. I don’t know any other authors can so deftly express so much about how our lives are constrained by the world and the people around us like Shirley Jackson. If you know of any, please recommend them to me.

I’ve re-read The Haunting on Hill House several times now. It’s a massive influence on my current project. Every time I’ve been stuck I’ve used as an opportunity to read it once again, and every time I leave it with fresh ideas and inspiration. It’s one of those books that instantly leapt into my all time favourites. I could easily read it over and over without it ever getting dull.

I’m now reading this collection of her short fiction, and with each story I love her work all the more. I’ve heard so many things about how good The Lottery is, only the quality of the stories before it is stopping me skipping forward and reading it first (it’s the last one in the collection). Each story is a snapshot into a world reflected through the eyes of her protagonist. The theme of each one is both simple and complex, a stream running deeper than it appears.

So if you want to mark International Women’s Day by reading a kick-ass female writer, and you haven’t discovered her already, I can’t recommend Shirley Jackson enough.

And so let this be a lesson in the benefits of branching out and trying something outside of your comfort zone. I discovered one of my favourite authors through by recognising that my reading wasn’t diverse enough and making the effort to do something about it. Let’s ignore the underlying problem of why it wasn’t diverse for now, shall we – That’s an issue for a different post – and imagine what I still have to discover by just making an effort to try something different?

International Women’s Day

It’s International Women’s Day, so let’s take a moment to share and celebrate some of the awesome women writers out there. And having looked through my bookshelves I’ve decided to share a series by one of the authors my mother introduced me to way back when I was a teenager; Susan Cooper’s ‘The Dark is Rising Sequence’.

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‘The Dark is Rising Sequence’ is an award winning contemporary interpretation of ancient celtic and Arthurian legends. Consisting of five novels written between 1965 and 1977, the Sequence tells the story of several children drawn into an ancient conflict between good and evil that dates back to the time of King Arthur.

This series really stuck with me when I first read it. So much so that it became one of those series that, once I had moved out and begun building my own library, I immediately looked out and purchased my own hardback copy. Cooper pulls together aspects of traditional Arthurian stories, celtic myths and legends, Welsh and British history and weaves them into a story that acts as both a wonderfully realised adventure story in its own right, and also as a perfect introduction to British fantasy traditions and stories that encouraged me to continue on into these stories that have been around for so many centuries, and how different writers now interpret them.

(Just avoid the film adaptation. Seriously, don’t even try. It’s not even bad enough to be good. You’ll regret both the wasted time and your life choices.)